How to build a resume that will get you hired

Your resume is your first chance at making an impression with a recruiter and can make or break your job hunt. Don't ruin your chance at your dream job with a unflattering resume. Get your resume is recruiter-ready and get on your way to landing your next role with these easy tips:

 

1. Keep it simple.

Don't worry about including everything you did at previous companies, you only need to give the recruiter the juicy details. A recruiter won't spend longer than a couple minutes max reviewing your resume, so don't let the important details get lost in the clutter and don't lose the reader's interest by rambling on. Anything worth elaborating on will be covered during the rest of the interview process. Paring down your resume so it's short, sweet, and to the point is crucial. 

2. Include only what's relevant.

The recruiter reviewing your resume does not need to know that you babysat your freshman year of college or that you scooped ice cream at Coldstone every summer in high school. Every resume you send out should be tailored to the position you're applying for, meaning applicable skills highlighted and irrelevant roles nixed. You only have one ptge to show off what you've accomplished, so don't waste space with unnecessary info.

3. Backup your claims with data.

Your resume will really stand out in a great way if you can provide evidence for your accomplishments in previous roles. For example, if you want to include that you built up your organization's social media presence, it's so much more powerful to say, "Managed Facebook page and grew following 250% month-over-month" than "Managed Facebook page."

4. Keep it clean.

It may be tempting to attempt to show off your personality with colors, crazy fonts or images on your resume, but this should definitely be avoided. Stay professional with simple serif or sans serif fonts (absolutely no comic sans), and try not to annoy the reader with lot of text effects (switching from bold, to italic, to underlined, etc). The point of your resume is to convey the main points of your experience quickly and concisely. If you distract from your professional accomplishments with frills and fluff, your resume isn't doing its job.

 

Taryn Anderson